Anxiety - 25% of Australians have it, so it’s worth talking about!

Earlier this month was OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) and Anxiety Awareness week in Victoria. However, with nearly 240,000 people in Western Australia experiencing anxiety this year it seems really important to talk about anxiety disorders here as well.


The best way to learn about someone is to take the time to listen to their story, the best way to understand someone is to step into their shoes. It is important for all of us to feel understood, this way we break down barriers and we find solutions. August brings a time to build our awareness of anxiety disorders, so, first, we went looking for real people’s descriptions of what anxiety feels like:

In one article from The Independent a woman explained the constant feeling of being anxious ‘as if she tripped and the moment where you don't know if you are going to catch yourself or not is how she felt all day long', and someone else describes ‘[It’s like] when you tap your pocket to get your wallet, and it is not there (and like the woman above said), it’s like that all the time.’

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‘Chronic Pain – Is it all in your head?’

For some, particularly those living right now with a chronic pain experience, this may be a painful question to read…it may be one that has been posed by a health professional sitting across a desk in front of you…it may have felt, and still feel, unfathomable that they could have said that to you…they may not have known the truth in their statement, but we are going to explain it to you now. We feel pretty confident you will feel better informed, and hopefully, even a bit better after you have thought about it…

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Latest Neuro-Rehabilitation News from Harvard Medical School

I have just returned from The 2018 International Neurorehabilitation Conference in Boston run by Harvard Medical School. I was one of hundreds of delegates from all over the world attending to get the latest updates on cutting-edge treatments to help people with brain problems. We had experts presenting on a large range of topics ranging from neuroplasticity to proven and state-of-the-art brain therapies.

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Can we eat enough of the good stuff every day? - Nutraceuticals

We are what we eat…But, do we? Can we? Eat enough of the good stuff EVERY day?

It’s time to talk about food, guts, brains and the slippery science of oils…

 Deciding what to eat can be an enormously effortful task. Aside from the vast choice available to us, we are also informed (not always necessarily well informed) about the choices we think we should be making…paleo this, low FODMAP that, raw something else, oops now I’m a flexitarian…the pleasure of eating can be spoilt by complexity sometimes. This is not to deride these choices, indeed they work well for some.

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Brain Scans Can Help To Personalise Treatment For Autism

There is an increasing trend in mental health towards efforts to go beyond the simple approach of selecting treatments based upon an individual’s symptoms or diagnosis. This of course is already the case for other branches of medicine where it is routine to “look a little deeper” and to use additional testing and gather extra information about the individual patient to help better direct treatment. An obvious example is headaches - Some people simply need to drink more water, whilst others might need a new prescription for their glasses, whilst others need surgery to remove a brain tumour.

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New 2 Minute Test For Autism

New research, published in The Journal of Developmental and Behavioural Pediatrics last month, has shown that a simple 2-minute questionnaire can help detect autism in toddlers. Research indicates that about 1% of children have Autism in Australia. Like all children, every child with Autism is unique, however there are core symptoms characterised by differences in behaviour, social interaction, communication and sensory processing. Every person is affected differently, and whilst some people with Autism also have an intellectual impairment or disability, some people have average or above-average intelligence. People with Autism often experience additional challenges and problems like ADHD, Anxiety and Depression are particularly common.

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Growing Evidence Of Brain Plasticity - Michael Merzenich

Neuroscientist Michael Merzenich looks at one of the secrets of the brain's incredible power: its ability to actively re-wire itself. He's researching ways to harness the brain's plasticity to enhance our skills and recover lost function.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

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Nature Play for Children

There is good evidence indicating that children are not spending enough time outdoors. There has been a dramatic shift over the past 30 years, affecting children in particular and “green places” have been replaced with “screen spaces.” The move indoors with a sharp increase in screen time is having a significant impact on children’s physical and mental health. Most of the children we see in clinic with problems like ADHD and Anxiety are spending too much time sitting indoors on screens and when they are just encouraged to simply get outside often start to feel better.

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How do drugs affect the brain? - Sara Garofalo

Most people will take a pill, receive an injection, or otherwise take some kind of medicine during their lives. But most of us don’t know anything about how these substances actually work. How can various compounds impact the way we physically feel, think, and even behave? Sara Garofalo explains how some drugs can alter the communication between cells in the brain.

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Light it up blue! - World Autism Awareness

What is Autism Spectrum Disorder?

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a persistent neuro-developmental disorder that affects how a person communicates, relates to other people, and how they experience the world around them. Often symptoms of ASD develop gradually, and parents will usually notice signs by around 2 yrs of age, when it becomes apparent they are not meeting their developmental milestones.1 Sometimes though, the symptoms can be subtle and may not be obvious until school age or even later in life. In Australia, around 1% of the population has ASD1 with males being 4 times more likely to be diagnosed than females. The cause of Autism is not clearly understood but it appears to be a complex interaction of both genetic and environmental factors.3

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How sugar affects the brain - Nicole Avena

When you eat something loaded with sugar, your taste buds, your gut and your brain all take notice. This activation of your reward system is not unlike how bodies process addictive substances such as alcohol or nicotine -- an overload of sugar spikes the number of signals being transmitted in the brain and leaves you craving more. Nicole Avena explains why sweets and treats should be enjoyed in moderation.

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Largest study of its kind finds alcohol use biggest risk factor for dementia

The results of possibly the largest study ever conducted looking at the relationship between alcohol consumption and dementia have just been published in The Lancet Public Health Journal.

Researchers in France studied over 1 million adults diagnosed with dementia and looked at the link with drinking alcohol. They found that the majority (57%) of adults diagnosed with early-onset dementia (that is dementia that starts before 65 years old), were associated with heavy drinking.

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Wouldn't it is amazing to be able to “look inside” your brain and see how it’s working? - International Brain Awareness Week


Wouldn't it is amazing to be able to “look inside” your brain and see how it’s working ? Well, thanks to brain research is now possible to do just this with special brain imaging known as QEEG. Scientists have been able to measure the activity from our brain since the 1930s, and this is known as EEG (or brainwaves), which is still used today to help diagnose conditions such as epilepsy.

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